Guardians for Future Generations

Guardians:

Protecting Future Generations so they can inherit a livable planet.

“I will not dishonor my soul with hatred

but offer myself humbly as a guardian of nature,

as a healer of misery, as a messenger of wonder,

as an architect of peace.” Diane Ackerman

Project Areas

Guardians in Action
A “Guardian” is a person representing the best interests of future generations who has the duty to ensure that a proposed action will provide ecologically healthy land, water, and air for the benefit of all. A Guardian takes a stand for what they love by getting involved in public policy in whatever way feels right.
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Guardian Wisdom Circles
A sacred space to reflect on and embrace both the inner work of protecting our inner vitality and outer work of standing up for future generations! We offer spiritual practices and support in challenging times!
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City Comprehensive Plans
Working with local cities and counties to get the Precautionary Principle in Comprehensive Plans
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Become a Guardian!
Get connected in a way that resonates with you! Join us by signing up here:
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Key Concepts

The Principles that underpin the Companion for Political Change

1

CENTRALITY OF THE COMMONS

The Commons is the environment we all share: air, water, soil, climate, animals, insects, and human culture of music, art, language, dance, and more. We recognize that we owe—and future generations deserve—a healthy Commons, passed down from each generation to the next. We must take care of the things we share and need to live, and we share a lot. A key role of government is to serve as the trustee or guardian of the common wealth and common health.

2
FREE, PRIOR, AND INFORMED CONSENT

Communities, like individuals, have the right to autonomy and self-determination, especially concerning decisions and actions affecting our Commons: We recognize that communities have the right and responsibility to refuse actions that may damage their environment. We recognize that we can, and must, insist that informed consent of everyone affected is obtained before any action is taken.

2
FREE, PRIOR, AND INFORMED CONSENT

Communities, like individuals, have the right to autonomy and self-determination, especially concerning decisions and actions affecting our Commons: We recognize that communities have the right and responsibility to refuse actions that may damage their environment. We recognize that we can, and must, insist that informed consent of everyone affected is obtained before any action is taken.

3
PUBLIC TRUST THEORY OF GOVERNMENT

The Public Trust theory of government, specifically that a key function of government is to protect the commonwealth and common health for present and future generations. It is the role of government to ensure that the Commons will be cared for generation after generation in perpetuity. Such emerging legal ideas can enlarge the concept of democracy, empower communities to protect their waters and future generations, and provide guidance on decision-making when faced with economic proposals.

4
THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE

Our planet’s future is uncertain. We recognize our responsibility to prevent harm, if possible, and to heed early warnings of harm. This is a statement of ethics. As we identify practices that are harmful to our planet, endangering our future, we must hold everyone accountable for their actions today: governments, businesses, communities, and individuals.

5
GUARDIANSHIP OF FUTURE GENERATIONS

Future generations have the right to an ecologically healthy environment, a habitable earth where they can thrive. We recognize our responsibility to tend and nurture that healthy environment. We can all become guardians and participate in decisions that impact future generations. We can designate legal guardians to review regulations for their impact on the future, and to audit the commons under our jurisdiction.

6
ECONOMIC JUSTICE - TOWARDS AN OWL ECONOMY

Our planet is a self-sustaining ecosystem and we are part of it. We recognize that we must not take more from the Earth than it can regenerate, or put more into it than it can restore.
An owl economy — as opposed to a bear and bull economy — is a wisdom-based approach to economics calling for recognition that the Earth is the source of our life and our economic activity. An economic system based on limitless extraction of resources, places, and people is unsustainable and unjust. Our economic tenets re-root our economics in the earth, honoring our relationship with the natural world and with each other.

7
WITHDRAWING CONSENT

We can withdraw our consent from decisions and actions that threaten and damage the future of our planet. We recognize our responsibility to withdraw our consent from a way of life that endangers our planet’s future. We recognize that when we—the affected, the governed—join together and withdraw our consent from corporate or government actions and practices, those who govern and conduct business have an obligation to respond.

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Do not lose heart. …. Especially do not lose hope. We were made for these times. For years, we have been learning, practicing, been in training for and just waiting to meet on this exact plain of engagement.  ...I grew up on the Great Lakes and recognize a seaworthy vessel when I see one. Regarding awakened souls, there have never been more able crafts in the waters than there are right now across the world. And they are fully provisioned and able to signal one another as never before in the history of humankind.

Clarissa Pinkola-Estes, adapted from Letter to a Young Activist